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Bayes Vilder has done his first 8b+, Rodeo Free Europe and we reached out to his father Matt, who back in the days made some 8a headlines including a 9a.

What is your sons climbing background?
Bayes has been climbing pretty much his whole life. In May he turned 10. He loves outdoor climbing but also competes in the youth circuit and is on the ABC climbing team in Boulder, CO. Over the past several years, he has really stepped up his outdoor game. He's had some great bouldering successes through the past few years climbing many V9s and some V10s and V11s. His success on routes has been mostly limited to the past year. His height has always been an issue on routes and prior to this last year, he wasn't climbing much on rope because it takes a lot of effort to go up a route only to find out that there's an impossible reachy move 3/4 of the way up.

At first last summer he was not very comfortable on 5.12s but eventually he succeeded on some 13a's. In the Fall we took a 2 week trip to the Red River Gorge and he climbed his first 13b (Golden Boy) and then shortly after climbed Swingline 13d in a day (4 tries I think). We bouldered a bunch this winter and he's done a few routes this Spring and Summer but didn't try much in the hard 13 or higher range. When we were out in Wild Iris over the 4th of July, Bayes succeeded on doing a short, bouldery 13d called White Buffalo and then set his sights on Rodeo Free Europe 14a.

On his first day (which was 3rd day on) he got all of the moves and a couple shorter links. He was pretty confident and so after a rest day on our last day of the trip, he got back on it fresh. He took a few goes to dial in some of the beta a bit more and then put in a handful of redpoint burns where he fell repeatedly stabbing a pocket after a double undercling move. He was ready to quit for the day, but decided to give it another go. All the pieces fell into place and he sent. Needless to say he was super psyched. I don't think he really had his sights specifically set on climbing 5.14 but this was a great route that really challenged him. I think he was proud because to him this felt like his hardest route to date (regardless of grades which are all over the place for his size).

He normally trains indoors with his team 3 days a week for 2 hours a day. Then we usually get outside for a day or two each week (or do another longer gym session if the weather is bad). We try to do several week long outdoor trips during the year where we are climbing as much as possible.

My 10-year-old just like playing around on 6a routes on a top rope. How come you think some kids are willing to push super hard taking long falls?
I think Bayes can push himself because he has built up this mindset from an early age. He is also pretty passionate about completing things that he tries and that motivates him quite a bit. Over the past year he has gotten pretty comfortable when taking falls, but he still is a bit hesitant to go for things onsight. When he knows the moves, he doesn't think twice about the fall even if he's pumped. He's good at executing in that way. My wife and I usually belay him and try to give him a soft catch since he's so light. I will often pull in some slack with my left arm when he falls and then catch most of the fall with that arm letting out the rope. Then the belay device catches and I'll try to jump up a little. It can be tough sometimes.

For kids climbing the mental attitude is so important and highly variable across kids. Bayes isn't particularly strong when it comes to having goals and being dedicated to them. However, he's really good at trying hard and giving 100% when he is on a climb. He also has a strong belief in himself when he climbs. He can push through the pain of sharp holds too which is hard for kids. Most of all, he just loves climbing and has fun almost every day we go out. He likes to push himself, but he also enjoys just climbing mid-range stuff that is classic.

Rodeo Free Europe 8b+ by Bayes Vilder (10)

Bayes Vilder has done his first 8b+, Rodeo Free Europe and we reached out to his father Matt, who back in the days made some 8a headlines including a 9a.

What is your sons climbing background?
Bayes has been climbing pretty much his whole life. In May he turned 10. He loves outdoor climbing but also competes in the youth circuit and is on the ABC climbing team in Boulder, CO. Over the past several years, he has really stepped up his outdoor game. He's had some great bouldering successes through the past few years climbing many V9s and some V10s and V11s. His success on routes has been mostly limited to the past year. His height has always been an issue on routes and prior to this last year, he wasn't climbing much on rope because it takes a lot of effort to go up a route only to find out that there's an impossible reachy move 3/4 of the way up.

At first last summer he was not very comfortable on 5.12s but eventually he succeeded on some 13a's. In the Fall we took a 2 week trip to the Red River Gorge and he climbed his first 13b (Golden Boy) and then shortly after climbed Swingline 13d in a day (4 tries I think). We bouldered a bunch this winter and he's done a few routes this Spring and Summer but didn't try much in the hard 13 or higher range. When we were out in Wild Iris over the 4th of July, Bayes succeeded on doing a short, bouldery 13d called White Buffalo and then set his sights on Rodeo Free Europe 14a.

On his first day (which was 3rd day on) he got all of the moves and a couple shorter links. He was pretty confident and so after a rest day on our last day of the trip, he got back on it fresh. He took a few goes to dial in some of the beta a bit more and then put in a handful of redpoint burns where he fell repeatedly stabbing a pocket after a double undercling move. He was ready to quit for the day, but decided to give it another go. All the pieces fell into place and he sent. Needless to say he was super psyched. I don't think he really had his sights specifically set on climbing 5.14 but this was a great route that really challenged him. I think he was proud because to him this felt like his hardest route to date (regardless of grades which are all over the place for his size).

He normally trains indoors with his team 3 days a week for 2 hours a day. Then we usually get outside for a day or two each week (or do another longer gym session if the weather is bad). We try to do several week long outdoor trips during the year where we are climbing as much as possible.

My 10-year-old just like playing around on 6a routes on a top rope. How come you think some kids are willing to push super hard taking long falls?
I think Bayes can push himself because he has built up this mindset from an early age. He is also pretty passionate about completing things that he tries and that motivates him quite a bit. Over the past year he has gotten pretty comfortable when taking falls, but he still is a bit hesitant to go for things onsight. When he knows the moves, he doesn't think twice about the fall even if he's pumped. He's good at executing in that way. My wife and I usually belay him and try to give him a soft catch since he's so light. I will often pull in some slack with my left arm when he falls and then catch most of the fall with that arm letting out the rope. Then the belay device catches and I'll try to jump up a little. It can be tough sometimes.

For kids climbing the mental attitude is so important and highly variable across kids. Bayes isn't particularly strong when it comes to having goals and being dedicated to them. However, he's really good at trying hard and giving 100% when he is on a climb. He also has a strong belief in himself when he climbs. He can push through the pain of sharp holds too which is hard for kids. Most of all, he just loves climbing and has fun almost every day we go out. He likes to push himself, but he also enjoys just climbing mid-range stuff that is classic.

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Spray of Light 8C by Vadim Timonov

Spray of Light 8C by Vadim Timonov

Vadim Timonov has done his third 8C in less than two weeks in Rocklands, Spray of Light. (c) Juliet Leonova

I hate this boulder because my fingers don't fit into the crack. the main difficulty was in the first two moves. Finally, this battle is over after 3 sessions spent.

Including also three 8B+’, out of which Oliphants Dawn in just 15 min, and the flash of The Guest list 8B it should be one of the most impressive two weeks tick lists ever achieved in Rocklands.

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Ghisolfi and Adamovska win in Briancon

Ghisolfi and Adamovska win in Briancon

Eliska Adamovska, who got the silver in the Euro Championship last year, won in Briancon after a great fight. Runner-up was Natalia Grossman meaning she got her seventh World Cup podium 2021.

Among the male, Stefano Ghisolfi won ahead of Dmitrii Fakirianov and Martín Stranik, after having done a remarkable save. As he failed to reach a hold, he basically pressed his hand against the wall creating compression on a huge volume.

It should be mentioned that the route setters have created possibly the most 3-D routes every creating many different solutions and drama from the beginning. One reason why nobody came close to the top, could be poor conditions due to the rain. (c) Jan Virt/IFSC

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The Arch 8B by Irina Kuzmenko

The Arch 8B by Irina Kuzmenko

Irina Kuzmenko, #3 in the Euro Bouldering Championship in 2019, has done her third 8B in 2021, The Arch in Rocklands.

Last trip in 2019 I did all the moves in one session and did not try to send it. This year just came and did it on my seventh attempts from the start. Hard topout, nice moves :) so happy I managed it quickly! Definitely came back stronger.

What is next? I’m working on Monkey Wedding (8B+). It is super hard but it feels I can do it :), maybe not this trip but still.

I did the first easiest part in one session and I am working on the hardest and the longest move in the second part. Hard to do it in a stable way but I believe it possible!

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Five female topps and Ghisolfi #1 after the semi

Stefano Ghisolfi and Sean Bailey scored 42+ after having touched the final jug but Ghisolfi was ranked #1 after the semi, due to countback. If they will get an identical score also in the final, Ghisolfi will win. Nine males, ranked #5 - 13, got within one hold and basically, it was a difficult clip that made the difference who was going to the final. A good strategy was to skip the clip which later forced some to start down climbing.

Among the girls, we saw five tops not counting Alex Totkova who was timed out. Natalia Grossman, who won the qualification, continued smiling her way up and is ranked #1 after the semifinal. In total, Slovenia got three girls into the final Top-8. The male final starts at 19.30 tomorrow Sunday followed by the female. Complete results

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Pure Dreaming 9a by Alfredo Webber (52)

Pure Dreaming 9a by Alfredo Webber (52)

Andrea Gennari Daneri from Pareti Magazine has helped out with some comments from Alfredo Webber, who just did his second 9a, Pure Dreaming in Arco. Adam Ondra made the FA of it in 2018. The 51-year-old and 159 cm tall did his first 9a in 2017. (c) Giacomo Tonoli

"When I bolted Pure Dreaming in February 2017 I didn't think I would be able to climb this line; I did not even imagine that I would have made almost 400 attempts spread over 3 and a half years of ups and downs, fingers open, desperate attempts at 35 degrees, with the cold, with the rain, days where logic led not even to leave home. Surprisingly, given the temperatures not exactly at the top, yesterday I managed to climb this line.

Thanks to Alessandro "Classe" Corradini for the endless belaying and his patience. I am also happy that staring at my ascent there was a talent of the new generations Andrea Chelleris (12) with his parents whom I thank for the cheering and for the video. I think that soon the next Pure Dreaming climber will be Andrea."


Alfredo's comments from 2017, when he did his first 9a are still interesting. "I’m close to 50 years old and now I work full time in a quarry, five days a week, 8 hrs a day. I wake up at 7 am, breakfast, then a 20 km drive to the quarry. Back home at 6 pm. Two days a week I have training on my wall at home. It’s a 1h 30’ work, basically long sequences, with intervals of some harder moves; then some hangs on crimps. When I’m projecting something hard for Sunday I have to rest on Friday and Saturday, otherwise, I get weak. I’m less powerful than 20 years ago, but now I know myself better and I manage better my energies."

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Delirium 8C by  Nick Bradley

Delirium 8C by Nick Bradley

Nick Bradley has done his second 8C, Delirium in Mt Evans and he has the video on Insta. The 24-year-old did his first 8B in 2015 and has since then built up a solid grade pyramid with 22 8B's and four 8B+' before doing his first two 8C's in 2021. " I did the left exit a few years ago so I had learned the beginning already. It took about 5 sessions this year to finish up Delirium."

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Alex Totkova (16) bronze interview

Alex Totkova (16) bronze interview

Alex Totkova made her first 8a headlines when she did her first 8a at age 12. Previously, she had for two years won all the comps she had done in Bulgaria, Petzen, Imst and Arco. Being 13, she did her first 8c and last year she sent her first 9a (8c+). In 2019, she started doing IFSC Youth Cups and although winning two events, half of the time she was outside the podium. In her WC debut, she was #18 and then #6 before getting the bronze in Chamonix. (c) Vladek Zumr

How can you training wise explain your great progress in 2021?
This season, which is not over yet 😊, was planned by my coaches a year earlier. They inspired me and motivated me that things could work out. For my preparation most of the time we trained in Bulgaria in NSA gym. We do not have the best conditions for lead in all Bulgaria and I mostly train on the boulder wall for endurance. But I hope that things will get better soon 😀. I have a training program but it is difficult for explain. We are training different for every competition.

How does it feel to have taken such big steps up in the ranking?
With a lot of experience and adrenaline from yesterday's final, I am almost happy with my climbing😚….. but not really happy🤷🏼‍♀️, because I could do a little more. I really want to get pump at my maximum as the best climbers do. And I think I didn’t do my best, yes nice climbing but not enough. Now l am looking for the next competition which is after a few days. I want to show my limit.🤪 TOP

What are your goals for 2021?
My dreams are my goal and I want to fulfil my dreams without anyone knowing about them. After fulfilling them maybe I will want to say😁😆

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Alone 9a FA by Pierre Le Cerf

Alone 9a FA by Pierre Le Cerf

Pierre Le Cerf has done the FA of Alone 9a in Gorges du Loup, which is an extension to an 8b+/c. (c) Loïc Athenon

"This project was a great lesson in life because, during the first two sessions, I barely reached the beginning of the hard passage. I fell each time on the first move after 35m of 8b+/c climbing. I lacked fluidity, mental strength for some parts, lower temperature and endurance in the forearms, and especially more endurance in the arms. I went back to training and inserted a bit of route-specific endurance into these workouts and I was doing circuits 8-10 min in my bedroom in the heat, without stopping, to get used to this long effort. I say "a great lesson in life" because in just two other sessions in the route I ended up doing it thanks to a great desire. Anything can happen quickly in life."

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