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Nihilist low 8B by Karoline Sinnhuber

Nihilist low 8B by Karoline Sinnhuber

Karoline Sinnhuber has done her sixth 8B, Nihilist low in zillertal. "Somehow I got fit over winter without being able to visit any gyms... weird things happening atm :D super psyched anyway! Let's go for the sit!"

Why are you using different shoes?
I used two different shoes because you have to make a foot swap on the big and slippery hold in my hands. Somehow the Drago sticks a bit better for the swap than the Instinct 😅.

How many sessions did it take and what about the sit start?
I did the ‚normal‘ Nihilist 8A a few years ago. Came back for the low start in autumn and had 2 sessions before it became too cold. This spring I spent another 3 or 4 sessions on it for the send. The Sit 8B+ adds another 2 moves, which are suuuuper hard.

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9a+ and 8c+ FAs by Seb Bouin

9a+ and 8c+ FAs by Seb Bouin

Sebastien Bouin reports on Insta that he has done the FAs of Oppression 8c+ and Les gardes fous 9a+, both in St Guilhem. The latter took some ten days and 25 tries. "I am preparing myself for a project in Spain, and I have the opportunity to mix outdoor and indoor climbing at home. So these routes were perfect. Waiting for good conditions in Catalunya, it was a good excuse to jump on these projects."

He is talking about Stoking the fire 9b in Santa Linya. "I would like to try the direct which could be a 9c project. But the first step is the 9b 😁."

The 27-year-old did his first 9a in 2011 and now he has done 65 of them, meaning that he is #5 on that list. His hardest are three 9B/+ out of which two FAs and Adam Ondra's Move. (c) Sam Bié

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Third 8c+ by Mattéo Soulé (14)

Third 8c+ by Mattéo Soulé (14)

Mattéo Soulé has done his third 8c+, Le blond, la brute et le manouche in Joncasses, after six sessions. "Awesome. Thirty movements without ever being able to put on chalk. The perfect route of resistence. Really fingery."

Already in 2017, he did his first 8b and later he has also flashed ten 8a+ and onsighted one. Last June, he did his first 8c+, Dieu merci and that one is still unrepeated.

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Mirage Gravitationnel 8c FA by Max Bertone (13)

Mirage Gravitationnel 8c FA by Max Bertone (13)

Max Bertone has done two FAs in Bras de la Plaine which have been bolted by Thierry Caillaud, Addiction 8b+ and Mirage Gravitationnel 8c. "Maybe 8c+, but I don't know if adults can reduce the number of moves in the crux section. Two sessions of work to send this perfect endurance test! Thanks to Thierry Caillaud for bolting this incredible route!"

It should be mentioned that prior to Max's FA, it was thought that Mirage was 8c+. Also noteworthy is that he yesterday, on his second go, did the second ascent of A la recherche des prises perdues 8b/+, giving it a personal 8a+ grade.

The 13-year-old is a sibling to Oriane (15), the best girl in the world for a couple of years in competitions as well as on rock.

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Vanitas 8C and 6 mm one-arm pull-up by Nomura Shinichiro

Vanitas 8C and 6 mm one-arm pull-up by Nomura Shinichiro

Shinichiro Nomura did his seventh 8C last month, Vanitas in Hourai, in just two sessions. "It required subtle footwork techniques rather than power, so I had a lot of frustration sometimes."

Since last year, Nomura is a full time professional climber. "My long term goal in climbing is sending difficult routes over 8C/V15 around the world and making FAs. I have three projects now. I’m sure one of them must be over 8C/V15 having really hard moves. Its size is huge and the moves required are also awesome. Another goal is making moves that are said to be impossible being short, in order to give hopes for those who don’t have long reach. My height is 159 cm."

In his latest Insta post, he is seen doing two one-arm pull-ups on a 6 mm edge. "I just concentrate on moving the first joint of fingers. Next is a 4 mm one hand pull up. My long time goal is a 1mm one hand pull-up! I’ve been climbing boulders indoors in order to overcome my weak point (reach), so I guess such training enrich my finger power consequently. I think many years of efforts have brought me the result.

I have climbed for 16 years now. I climb 5 or 6 times a week in a gym and I take about 3 hours in each climbing session. Also, I go outside climbing once in two weeks."


Interestingly, it takes 1.5 hours for him to go to the nearest climbing area by car, and it takes four hours to reach his current projects as well as his latest 8C.

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Tina J Hafsaas talks about eating disorder

Tina J Hafsaas talks about eating disorder

Tina Johnsen Hafsaas, three times a winner in the Euro Youth Cup and #4 in the WC in Chamonix in 2017, has spoken out in Norwegian climbing media, together with Magnus Midtbö, about their eating disorder. We asked Tina if she could share some thoughts on 8a. (c) Arc’teryx and Mattis G. Husby

”Growing up I felt like all the climbers I knew and looked up to were having a difficult relationship with food. I thought it was, as big part of the game, as training endurance. I watched my first world cup at 14, at the same time as I was competing as an up and coming international youth competitor. I was fueled with impressions, and the better I got in youth the better (and thinner) the people I looked up to. I guess as a teenager you shouldn’t really compare your body to adults who have trained for a decade, but when your idols looked like what they did to me it definitely made an impact on what I believed our sport was about. I think not talking about weight, training, food and consequences makes it worse, because young athletes draw conclusions of their own. Adult climbers using weight to peak performance is normal, as it is in every elite sport, but we should talk more about context. Being young you want to be the best now right away, but by having a more long-term mindset you realize that pushing your body too far with malnutrition as a teen you actually lower your potential long-term.”

What can be done to reduce the problem?
I believe for competition climbing the route setters have the power. It has been a major change in style in the last years forcing athletes to be more powerful. The massive change in climbing holds has obviously contributed to the change of style as well. The federations can always do more and better. Thanks to a lot of brave people it’s getting talked about more and we should keep it going, answer questions openly and honestly and hopefully contribute to making the sport easier to grow up in.

For rock, it’s definitely different because there are no federations or rules to follow. You can always find a route that fits your style and lose as much weight as you want just to climb it. But losing weight for most people is not just about that one climb. It’s easy to get trapped in a world of misery and sadness and no climb is worth that. I hope that climbers sharing their stories make other climbers more aware of the consequences of pushing it too far and how easy it is to lose control.

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Kraftplatzl 9a by Christof Rauch

Kraftplatzl 9a by Christof Rauch

Christof Rauch, who has done more than 800 boulders 8A and harder, out of which eleven 8C's, has done his third 9a, Kraftplatzl in Berglsteiner See. Amazingly, Christof is just 26 and is working full time.

"Epic fight! Had to dig really deep on the last few moves! Perfect power endurance testpiece from David Lama! Took me two days a few years ago and three days this year. As typical for me, I did it on the last try of the day. Thanks to Tobi for the support!"

You also did an 8c+ two weeks ago but no boulders last month? Why this change of focus and what is next?
"We have really good route climbing in Tyrol and most of the boulders I'm psyched for are still wet/covered with snow. I have no big projects at the moment, just a few routes that I checked out recently."

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Kyra Condie Olympic training interview

Kyra Condie Olympic training interview

Kyra Condie started to climb at age 11 and almost directly it was discovered that she had severe idiopathic scoliosis. In 2010, she did spinal fusion surgery to correct her more than 70-degree curvature and the doctors did not think she could continue to climb. In 2019, she qualified to Tokyo in Toulouse by being #7 which was quite a sensation as she previously the same year, only once had been Top-13 out of 18 World Cups. Last December she was listed on the Forbes30 under 30 list.

How much does the spinal fusion surgery affect your climbing nowadays?
Basically, it affects my climbing all the time and it is why I climb the way I do. The entire section of my back can not bend or twist at all. I think if you watch me climb. I tend to stay really straight on the wall. I do not twist a ton and I do not climb super gracefully. I usually have to muscle through moves that most people would be able to bend or twist and that makes it looks nicer.

Could you please explain a normal training week?
Let’s see, a normal training week consists of five days of training and two full rest days. Each day I have to do double sessions where one session is a workout and the other session is climbing. Sometimes the workout it weights or cardio, sometimes it’s more climbing-specific like campusing or hangboarding! We also make sure to do speed once a week as well as specifically competition boulders

Who are your training partners and what do they mean to you?
I’ve been training a lot with Allison Vest who’s also my roommate! She moved down from Canada so we could train together. I also have been on the same schedule as Nathaniel Coleman so we’ve been doing a lot together, which I think is awesome for our team camaraderie and for the psych! There’s also a big group of younger girls here who are incredibly psyched and motivate me every day!

How do plan to compete before Tokyo?
The plan is to go to as many world cups that I can go to safely! As well as continue doing mock competition rounds and prepare as best as possible in Salt Lake.

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