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Lena Müller and the ecological crises

Lena Müller and the ecological crises

Lena Marie Müller is currently doing a PhD at the University of Innsbruck about the effects of climate change on mountain ecosystems. In 2020, she became the first German woman to climb an 8b+ trad (E9/E10) by repeating the route “Prinzip Hoffnung”, which she mostly reached from Innsbruck by train. (c) Paul Lewandowski

What can the climbing community do to reduce their carbon footprint?
The carbon footprint for everyone, as well as us climbers, is composed of what we eat, our mobility, how we live (heating our house, electricity), and what we consume. So, to reduce our footprint we can address all those aspects. For example, we can change our diet to regional and organic products and consume little meat and dairy products. Further, we can change our mobility by reducing the time spent in the car/plane but instead use public transport and the bike. In our home, we can switch to sustainable, clean energy. Further, we can change the consumption to sustainable products and simply consume less. Another aspect is how we invest our money, here we can change to a greener bank.

Besides the changes we can implement in our personal lives, I think it is inevitable that we put pressure on politicians by collectively going to the streets and demanding climate action. Because ultimately, climate protection is a question of political will. Every one of us can join the climate movement and stand up for climate protection. On top of that, I think it’s important to spread awareness about our climate crisis. The more people know about the climate crisis, the more personal change will take place, and the more people we are to put pressure on politicians by striking and voting.

Do you know how to measure like one flight to Kalymnos compared to travelling to the crag, what is worse?
Roughly speaking, the same emissions are produced if one person flies to Kalymnos or the same person drives more than a hundred times to a crag which is 30km away. Hence, flying does have a huge impact. To put these emissions from travelling for climbing into perspective, I would like to introduce the concept of the “climate-friendly carbon footprint”. This footprint is in accordance with the Paris Agreement in 2015 with the target to limit global warming to 1.5°C by the end of this century. While we must acknowledge that is difficult to achieve this climate-friendly footprint, either flying to Kalymnos once a year or travelling to climbing by car for a year basically depletes the carbon available from our annual climate-friendly footprint. Hence, we have no emissions left for other carbon generating aspects in our lives (as mentioned above) if we want to live sustainably.

So basically, the thing we should tell the community, in regards to the climbing activity, is to travel less, especially by plane, commute and climb more locally.
Regarding our sport, I agree that emissions are mainly caused by how we travel for climbing, and what/how much we consume for it.

I guess everyone must decide this on her/his own. But it would make a big impact if we as a climbing community would step away from that much travel. That’s why we introduced the “ecopoint” – a term that describes climbing by public transport or bike. By giving this concept a name and reality, we hope to enhance sustainable climbing in the face of the climate crisis. More in her Insta

In the end, we must acknowledge that we live in a world where our actions affect people on the other side of the world or those who will be living at the end of the century. We are living from the CO2 budget of other people (to come). I think we must ask ourselves, how far we want to take our freedom. Being a climber often means we have a lot of freedom. The freedom of time, the freedom of resources, the freedom of doing something we love. So instead of defending this ecological exploitation under the guise of freedom - why not use some of our time and resources to reconsider how we can live more sustainably and be part of demanding political change?

Because the good news is, we still have the chance to stay below 1.5°C of global heating if we act now and we also have the means to achieve a brighter climate reality.

Joe Cita 9a by Anak Verhoeven

Joe Cita 9a by Anak Verhoeven

Anak Verhoeven reports on Insta that she has done Joe Blau 8c+ and Joe Cita 9a in Oliana. "Probably the 9th grade send-attempt I’ve enjoyed the most so far. 😊 
A route with lovely climbing from the very beginning, lots of cool moves and a super spicy slab ending. I’m particularly grateful for this send because my right pinky has been bothering me for the last 2 months." (c) Toni Mas Buchaca

The Belgian is a previous very successful competition climber and when it comes to outdoors, she has done 12 routes 8c+/9a and harder. In other words, although being just 25-years-old, she is one of the best female climbers in history.

How was the process taking it down and what is next?
I first spent some time figuring out the beta for the upper part — a slab with a deadpoint move. The first time I managed to do the deadpoint was in the dark with a headlamp. Once I had that dialled, I made sure I knew exactly how to climb the lower part of the route. The day I did a first attempt, I was pretty tired, but decided to give it a go anyway. I passed the hardest sections as well as the slab crux at the end, but fell at the very top with a foot slip, right before going to a jug. I rested for two days and on my next try (my second redpoint attempt) I topped the route. As for the number of sessions: I can’t really tell, because I had already figured out the beta for the first part when doing Patxitxulo last October. But it’s somewhere around 6 sessions during this trip.

What’s next? Well, I have several options in mind for routes I’d like to try, but I don’t have a new project yet. So I won’t say more for now. :)

MORE NEWS

Hanabi 8c+ FA by Yuji Hirayama (52)

Hanabi 8c+ FA by Yuji Hirayama (52)

Yuji Hirayama, one of the true climbing legends, reports on Insta that he has done the FA of Hanabi 8c+, which means firework, Mt Futago. (c) Shinta Ozawa

Since 1986, when Yuji did Le Specialist 8b+, the now 52-year-old has been on the cutting edge. In 1991, he won his first World Cup and in 1998, as well as in 2000, he won overall. After his competition career, he made the FA of Flat Mountain 9a/+ in 2003 and the next year he onsighted White Zombie 8c. A few years later he did Cobra Crack 8c trad and the FA of an MP in Borneo including one 9a pitch. In his resume, being one of the best multi-discipline climbers in history, he has also made boulders up to 8B+, DWS up to 8b+, several big walls including also several times have had the Speed record up on El Cap. Since 2010, he runs Climb Park Base Camp which over the years have organized several competitions. He has also been active in the Japanese Federation and helping out IFSC getting climbing into the Olympics.

Kimera 8C by Niccolò Ceria

Kimera 8C by Niccolò Ceria

Niccolò Ceria has published the full story of sending Christian Core's Kimera (8C) 8C in Rifugio barbara. In 2007, Ceria watched a DVD video when Core made the FA and since then it has been on his mind. Previously, only Elias Iagnemma had repeated it although it was put up in 2006.

So did you spend like 40 sessions on it or even more?
I think less. I would say nearly 40 check-days. In most of these times, I returned back to the car for humid/wet holds. On other occasions, I only tried the dry part.

Is this the most you have ever worked a boulder?
Yes. Considering the whole experience it was definitely my longest journey on a boulder, even if I only had a couple of moments in 8 years when it was potentially fully climbable. I spent a lot of sessions just repeating the first half because of the complicate conditions which are anyway part of the story :)

In the last episode of Beyond Focus with Adam Ondra, he shows us how he trained in a sauna, how he dealt with pressure and the media and says that he sacrificed two years of outdoor climbing.

Ondra beyond focus trained in a sauna before the Olympics

In the last episode of Beyond Focus with Adam Ondra, he shows us how he trained in a sauna, how he dealt with pressure and the media and says that he sacrificed two years of outdoor climbing.

Hallucination 8C+ by Kazuma Ise (19)

Hallucination 8C+ by Kazuma Ise (19)

Kazuma Ise has made the FA of Hallucination 8C+ in Hourai, after the break. Dai Koyamada put it up as an 8B+ in 2003 and over the years many have tried to repeat it in the new much harder version. In the new crux you first make a dead point to a crimp from a one-finger sidpull and then another dead point to one more one-finger sidepull.

How much and How did you train for your project?
I only trained twice a week for five hours each. On my non-training days I work part-time, go to school and hang out with girlfriend. I did't train for anything other than the project. There was a possibility of getting a severe injury, so I decided that training twice a week was appropriate.
How do you train during the five-hour session?Warming up can be done in 15 minutes. Afterwards, crimp training, one finger training and weighted crimp pull-ups for two hours. The last two hours are free session time.


What are your next plan? Floatin 8C+ in Mt.Mizugaki and Epitaph (after the break) in Horai, probably also 8C+. These are my goals for 2022 and also to send 9A. Maybe Finland's BOD or a new 9A.

Der mit dem Fels tanzt 8C by Luis Gerhardt

Der mit dem Fels tanzt 8C by Luis Gerhardt

Luis Gerhardt has repeated Martin Keller's Der mit dem Fels tanzt (8C) in Chironico. "This one got on my nerves after falling twice at the mantle that day! After another silly foot slip close before the end I wanted to finish the session. I felt pretty exhausted but wanted to give one more try before it got dark! Not sure how but on the last try I found myself standing on top of the boulder!" (c) Nora Pailer

How many sessions did it take?
It took 8 - 10 sessions including the other variations (Insanity, Delusion, Einfisch) :)

Roadkill 8C by Graham and Lechaptois

Roadkill 8C by Graham and Lechaptois

David Graham and Clément Lechaptois report on their Insta (DG) and Insta (CL) that they have repeated Shawn Raboutou's Roadkill (8C) in Valle Bavona. (c) Kim Marschner

Dave and Clement worked the high-class problem mainly together and did finally a team ascent and Dave's Insta is as always full of intense details. "After 5 sessions I was confident I could climb through the crux down low; two very low percentage moves with my method, a tripped out ghost kneebar into a low percentage jump. I had rehearsed the top section many times, but felt extremely anxious about the technical mantel moves at around 8 meters followed by the last 10 meters of slab climbing which is not particularly hard, but revolves around trusting your feet and climbing very confidently in a true no-fall zone." He continues by saying that Lechaptois had a much scarier ascent with a headlamp.

Kout pikle 9a+ FA by Adam Ondra

Kout pikle 9a+ FA by Adam Ondra

Adam Ondra has done the FA of Kout pikle (9a+) in Moravský kras. "Really hard to grade, could be 9b for sure. Amazing 8Cish boulder to start in a dihedral (!!), then power endurance of 8c to the top. I love this line. Such a cool style, ultra technical and ultra physical too."

More pics on his Insta where he also says. "The grade is somewhere between 9a+ and 9b, but let's be on the safe side with 9a+😅"

As was mentioned in an editorial grade article yesterday, "If it had not been for guys like Adam Ondra and Alex Honnold etc giving their honest opinions, the grade inflation had been much stronger. My personal recommendation is that whenever you are in grade doubt of a FA, go for the lower one."