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The Island, 8B+ by Jan Hojer
  2013-01-01 00:00:00    
Jan Hojer finished of a very succesful 2012 by doing Dave Graham's The Island, 8B+ in Fontainebleau. Now he is working the big sit start adding one grade. The next week he will start training for the World Cup where his ambition is around #5 overall.

How much and how do you train?
I'm often alternating weeks with many sessions (4-5) and less intensive weeks with only 2 sessions, depending on how i feel. A session rarely takes longer than two hours...

I agree what Tyler Landman says about training, "
"My tip for getting stronger is to climb steep, straight angles, 30-45 degrees; big moves between bad holds, where you must keep your feet on. This develops footwork and body tension. No heel hooks, toe hooks or anything like that, just basic straightforward pulling".


Sometimes he also does five seconds front lever in his pinkies!
Click to Enlarge Picture
OffLine Matthew Tschippert
  2013-01-01 18:56:33    
Well, he is on his pinkies... on a shallow pocket... You kind of need to bend your elbows to not fall off the hang board.
OffLine Gabriel Moch
  2013-01-01 18:58:03    
He is hanging from his pinkies, just crushed the island , flashes v12 for dessert and you are  questioning  about his front lever ???? crap!!!!!

SICK INSPIRATION FOR ME, perfect front lever or not!!!!!

Keep it up Jan!!!!!!!!!!!!
OffLine Jan Schubert
  2013-01-01 20:10:24    
The Front leaver is even more impressive considering he is 186 tall. Does anyone know his current weight?
OnLine Jens Larssen
  2013-01-01 22:38:03    
I just think it is fantastic that you can be one of the best even in comps without doing any hard structured training. It must be very nice for other youngsters who have big ambitions but who does not have a trainer or time, to hear that it is not mandatory to train 20 hours with a structure.
OnLine Christian Stohr
  2013-01-02 11:49:44    
That might just be a bad impression for the youth. As Patxi Usobiaga said (in a video available on youtube) he had to train 7days a week to get a title whereas there are a lot of talented young climbers out there who don't need to train hard. 
But if you're not talented and you have big ambitions then you probably should take your time to do a structured training. Telling yourself others can perform well without training and so will you won't help.

Oh, and I think Jan Hojer does have a structured training, simply because he quotes Tyler Landman. Plus he's part of the German Team (DAV Kader) with Udo Neumann being a good coach as far as I can tell.
OnLine Jens Larssen
  2013-01-02 11:55:48    
I do not see a problem. Some like to train hard and some do not. Some like to train structured and some do not. One year you can train hard and structured and the next year you can take it easy... without getting anexiety. Just climb and have fun training structutred or not.

I just find it nice that you can have high ambition without doing very hard and very structured training like you have to do in most other sports.
OffLine Peter Klaun
  2013-01-02 12:34:23    
the pinky front lever pic was taken in one of his less intense sessions - jans "not training hard" is not exactly what us mere mortals think of as easy sessions.
OnLine Jens Larssen
  2013-01-02 13:27:58    
I just think it is good that you can be one of the best in the world training less than ten hours a week. Sure thing while he is training you can expect him to train super hard.
OffLine Terje StrÝm
  2013-01-02 14:33:10    
High intensity and a lot of restitution is the way to get strong. Many hours of training is just for the endurance freaks.
OffLine Jan Schubert
  2013-01-02 15:41:53    
"High intensity and a lot of restitution is the way to get strong. Many hours of training is just for the endurance freaks."

I think this is a very good point. In bouldering its more about pure strength, in your body as well as in your fingers. Strenght training does not need to be that extensive. Its the endurance training that takes the most time. So i guess its not that uncommon that the boulder guys are not training as much as the lead guys for example.
I believe Kilian once said he is not training too much either.
OffLine tom
  2013-01-03 11:02:06    
Double post
OffLine tom
  2013-01-03 11:04:29    
Hi. I have some questions regarding the" intensive" sessions.

I have problems finishing up in two hrs sometimes because I have to take breaks in between individual gos. How do pros set up the training?

- just try to pull as hard as possible for an hr or so? Then finish even if not really tired?

- so they alternate hard and easy boulders?

- stretch much in between?

-seperate campus and hang board training from normal bouldering.

- maybe somebody knows more guidelines than the ones from JH and TL.

- set a super hard move and just try that?

Thanks and cheers!

OffLine somebody
  2013-01-03 11:52:49    
Regarding tom's post:
Maybe somebody could make an article/forum topic for trainingcontents?
Or does something like this already exist?
Everybody could share their methods and particulary contents for specific strength/endurance/technic/tactic training...
To show what I mean some examples for each:
- systematic-boulders[hard with focus on one kind of holds/movements] (strength)
- pyramids[climb without a break, example with max. difficulty 9uiaa: 6-7-8-9-8-7-6] (endurance)
- easier routes with focus on smooth movements (technic)
- Do many serious onsight-attemps in a gym you don't know the lines (tactic)
OnLine Paul Brouard
  2013-01-03 17:40:59    
You should check out the climbcoach iphone app. They have loads of good workouts. Personally, when I've had less time available, I've had a lot of success bouldering with increased resistance (using a weight belt). Also with teasing out different movement types and strengths and working on the ones I'm weak at. So for instance, I'm good at movement but bad at lock offs so I try to do problems with a 3 second pause before holding each hold. I'm great on crimps but bad on pinches and half-crimp so most hangboard time is geared towards this.
It is worth noting that, especially in the beginner to intermediate stage, there is an essential disconnect between what would be best for strength and what would be best for learning to be a better climber. Rest may be good to build strength but climbing is so movement centered that practicing everyday may be more important than rest.
OnLine Paul Brouard
  2013-01-03 17:41:00    
You should check out the climbcoach iphone app. They have loads of good workouts. Personally, when I've had less time available, I've had a lot of success bouldering with increased resistance (using a weight belt). Also with teasing out different movement types and strengths and working on the ones I'm weak at. So for instance, I'm good at movement but bad at lock offs so I try to do problems with a 3 second pause before holding each hold. I'm great on crimps but bad on pinches and half-crimp so most hangboard time is geared towards this.
It is worth noting that, especially in the beginner to intermediate stage, there is an essential disconnect between what would be best for strength and what would be best for learning to be a better climber. Rest may be good to build strength but climbing is so movement centered that practicing everyday may be more important than rest.